Removing the water pump

Today I removed the radiator, fan and water pump.  A process you would have to do if you wanted to replace the water pump.  The radiator is easy to remove once the hoses are disconnected.  There are only 4 bolts holding it in place.  The red fan is the next thing to removed.  This is also simple.

Radiator gone. Fan is next.

Radiator gone. Fan is next.

The fan

Here is the removed fan.

Here is the removed fan.

Four 10 mm bolts hold it in place.  The fan fits pretty snug on the water pump shaft so it needs to be gently pried off.  Interesting the distribution of blades, purposely not equidistant.

The water pump pulley comes right off once the fan is removed.

Water pump pulley

Water pump pulley

And below is the view of the open space once occupied by the water pump.  Somewhat visible is the gunk found inside the water pump.

Area once occupied by the water pump

Area once occupied by the water pump

The water pump is held in place by 7 bolts; 4 (10 mm) bolts and 3 (14 mm) nuts.  It’s almost impossible to remove these with the radiator and fan still in place, so save yourself a lot of frustration and remove those first.

Gunked up

Gunked up

There is no way this water pump was cooling anything.  I took a water hose and screw driver to it and cleaned it up.  However the main water ways remained clogged with hardened minerals.  Which reminds me, I should have the radiator flushed before considering returning it to cooling duty.

Gunkless

Gunkless

This water pump saw its last 2002 ride.  Not that I would consider using it even if it was in better shape.  Cooling is too important to take a chance on a used water pump.

Here is the front of the water pump.

Front face of the water pump.

Front face of the water pump.

Outside of all the gunk the water pump still appeared to function as it should.  The clogged water ways would prevent water from flowing through.

That completes the removal of the cooling system.  I hope this helps you in your project.

Enjoy.

Abel

 

Disassembly continues

Here is the continuation of my disassembly of my ’75 Braun 2002.  I’m removing the engine at this stage piece by piece and documenting as I go.  The car is 99.5 percent complete with the exceptions of some minor items, like the head rests, center console and gas pedal.  My intention is to remove as much as I can before I send it to body and paint shop.  Here are some photos:

 

Filter/Sensor?

I have no idea what this does.

 

Filter/sensor?

Attached to intake manifold and carburetor

I’m sure it has a name, and perhaps someone out there can chime in, but it appears to connect to the intake manifold and the carburetor.  A filter perhaps?

Below, I’m about to remove the alternator.

Dusty alternator

Dusty alternator

…and it’s gone.

Alternator spot

Empty spot where alternator belongs

The alternator has two bolts that hold it in place.  The harder one to remove is the one next to the water hose.  There is not much room there.

Cooling sludge

Sludge

The brown clumps in the center of the photo is sludge.  The hose I removed was full of it.  I don’t know what it consists of but perhaps now is a good time to talk about radiator flushes.  I am the 2nd, 3rd, 4th or 5th owner of the car so I’m not privy to all the chemicals this cooling system may have ingested in its lifetime.  This looks and feels like some leak clogging agent that may have been used as a stop gap measure.

Here is a picture of the car’s firewall:

firewall

Driver side firewall

The hose is the return from the heater core that connects to the intake manifold.  The rod jotting out is the accelerator linkage.  If you look closely at the firewall where it attaches you’ll see a plastic type socket that the rod rides on.

Intake ports

Intake manifold removed

Here are 3 of the 4 intake ports.  Removing the intake manifold was a bear.  I had to remove the starter first in order to get to the bottom two rear bolts of the manifold.  However, I could only move the starter to the side as there was not enough room to pull it out.

The next post will contain photos of the radiator, water pump and head removal..hopefully.

If you’re interested in a specific engine area let me know and I’ll make a point to document it in greater detail.

Enjoy.

Abel

 

 

Remove Tighten side view mirror

My side view mirror had been loose for quite some time and past attempts to tighten it failed miserably. An assumption I made, a bad one, had me trying to tighten the side view mirror from the inside of the door.  I removed the door panel and raised the window, and I was able to locate the two nuts that support the side view mirror.  The problem is that it’s almost impossible to reach them, let alone manipulate them.  I knew there had to be a straight forward way that I wasn’t seeing…and after some ruminating, some investigating I found what I was missing.  The side view mirror has a Phillips head screw on the side of the base that’s hidden behind the rubber seal.  See below:

mirror1

Installed side view mirror

BMW 2002 side view mirror

Visible Phillips head screw.

rubber base for side view mirror

Rubber base for side view mirror

Support structure for the side view mirror.

Support structure for the side view mirror.

Once you have the mirror removed tighten the screws to firm up the base, then reverse the process to install the mirror.

That’s it!  It took me a while to figure it out, and I’m sure if I would have spent some time on the Internet I would have found the instructions.  So don’t let my failing be yours.

Abel